Sunday, September 9, 2012

Advanced Tapestry Techniques


Lesson 10 of the Craftsy Bead & Tapestry Cuff class teaches advanced tapestry techniques. Upon first viewing it, I felt as if I’d been suddenly thrown into the deep end of the pool. After many slow and steady lessons, this class uses frequent new terms and I must admit, unfortunately does not always employ the best photography. The techniques themselves are not really all that difficult but if it is one’s first time attempting them, I am certain that you will need to watch multiple times before catching on. The thirty-second rewind feature is useful although I found I required more than just the quick thirty seconds to review certain sections. (I cannot speak for everyone’s experience however it seems that the Craftsy platform does not always allow for smooth rewinding and fast forwarding although this could perhaps just be a problem with my own computer.) My criticism of the photography concerns the bad angles that are sometimes used and the need for more close ups. As Claudia does admit however, if you are seriously interested in learning more about tapestry, any of the many books available at www.mirrixlooms.com will provide the necessary depth that is beyond the scope of this class. I've purchased Kirsten Glasbrook's classic and look forward to diving into it as soon as I've completed this course.

Pick and Pick


          

                                                    Wavy Lines & Lazy Lines


Minor concerns aside, I seriously love the results of “pick and pick” or what I prefer to call simply vertical striping. The beauty of these advanced techniques is that suddenly the whole process of weaving becomes quite clear in a novel way. Of course, if you weave in one shed with one color and the following shed in another, you will get vertical stripes. Two passes with one color followed by two passes with a second color will yield horizontal stripes. Brilliant. For me, the term “lazy line” seems a little too close to “wavy line.” (And why not just call it “diagonal line” which is what it is?) And if anyone can explain the difference to me between hatching and shading, I’m all ears. Also, those special situations when the edge warps are lowered are a little confusing but once again I’m sure a little more experience will clear this up.
 

                                                        Finished on the loom


                                                         Weaving two at a time!

                                                           

Well, as they say, practice makes perfect and I’m more than willing. My first cuff has attracted so much attention that I’m afraid I’ve already overextended myself gift-wise. This should keep me busy for quite some time.

If anyone needs me, I'll be weaving tapestry cuffs.

xxx, Karen
 

1 comment:

Janette Meetze said...

Karen it seems to me that you are doing remarkably well for your first tapestry weaving experience. The Kirstan Glasbrook book will help sort out some of those terms but I would also recommend Tapestry 101 by Kathe Todd Hooker. It has very clear drawn diagrams of the different tapestry techniques and will help with terms also. Tapestry is a great adventure, simple on the surface and endlessly complex when you dig a little deeper. Your work is looking beautiful. Enjoy the journey.